At The Museum: June 15-21

JUNE 15- 21 :  HAYING & FATHER’S DAY

Hay!  What are you doing?

Hay!  Hay!  Hay!

Haying and the flax harvest will continue throughout the week in parts of America.  Come out to the 1820s American Farm and try your hand at mowing with a scythe. Also, we’ll still be haying in Ireland this week as well.

The Shenandoah Valley was an important center of livestock and wheat production in the early 19th century. Farmers needed to raise food for the livestock and that required cutting hay several times a year. Before mechanical equipment was developed this was all done by hand. Often farmers would help each other with haying, and farms prepared lots of food to feed the volunteer work crews.  We’ll be recreating this traditional activity on Saturday at the 1850s American Farm.

Other activities throughout the week will focus on preparations for the celebration of Father’s Day.

Highlighted Activities Throughout The Week

The Mount Tabor Log Church exhibit is now open

The Mount Tabor Log Church exhibit is now open on the hill above the 1820s American Farm

Mount Tabor Log Church:  The NEW EXHIBIT is now open on the top of the hill above the 1820s American Farm.

Monday (June 15)

  • 1700’s Irish Farm: Haying while the sun is shining!
  • 1600’s English Farm: Garden work; Spinning
  • 1700’s German Farm: Spinning (2:00-4:00)

Tuesday (June 16)

  • 1700’s Irish Farm: Grinding oats (10:00-12:00); Weaving (2:00-4:00)
  • Ganatastwi: Games
  • 1740’s American Farm: Woodworking
  • Early American School House: The Schoolmaster is in! Storytelling with the youth campers
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Foodways in Germany

Wednesday (June 17)

  • 1700’s West African Farm: Working on the new forge
  • 1600’s English Farm: Fence repair
  • 1700’s Irish Farm: Haying (2:00-4:00)
  • 1700’s German Farm: Making noodles
  • 1700’s Irish Forgeforging a golf club head for the Father’s Day
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Forging a golf club head for Father’s Day!

Thursday (June 18)

  • 1700’s West African Farm: Working on the new forge
  • 1700’s Irish Farm: Haying (10:00-12:00); Spinning (2:00-4:00)
  • 1700’s Irish Forgeforging a golf club head for the Father’s Day
  • 1700’s German Farm: Haying and vineyard work
  • 1820’s American Farm:  Woodworking
Mowing with a scythe was the preferred method of harvesting hay

Mowing with a scythe in 1820

Friday (June 19)

  • 1600’s English Farm: Foodways (10:00-2:00); Cleaning (2:00-4:00)
  • 1700’s Irish Farm: Foodways (10:00-12:00); Cleaning (1:00-2:00)
  • 1700’s Irish Forgeforging a golf club head for the Father’s Day
  • 1700’s German Farm: Foodways (10:00-12:00); Cleaning (1:00-2:00)
  • 1820’s American Farm:  Foodways (10:00-12:00); Cleaning (1:00-2:00)
  • 1850’s American Farm:  Foodways (10:00-12:00); Cleaning (1:00-2:00)

 

Preparing the Harvest Meal for the haying laborers

Preparing the Harvest Meal for the haying laborers

Saturday (June 20)

  • 1700’s Irish Farm: Haying (10:00-12:00); Weaving (2:00-4:00)
  • 1700’s Irish Forge: Dump Cart reassembly; Making field hoes & andirons
  • 1600’s English Farm: Baking (10:00-2:00); Washing dishes (2:00-4:00)
  • 1700’s Irish Farm: Haying (10:00-12:00); Weaving (2:00-4:00)
  • 1820’s American Farm:  Haying (10:00-12:00 & 3:00-4:00); Foodways (1:00-3:00)
  • 1850’s American Farm:  Haying & Meal preparation (morning); Harvest Meal (afternoon)

Sunday (June 14)

  • 1600’s English Farm: Garden work
  • 1700’s Irish Farm: Haying
  • 1740’s American Farm: Haying (10:00-12:00 & 2:00-4:00)
  • 1850’s American Farm:  Games in the yard

 

The Mount Tabor log Church is now officially open!  After more than 2 years of work disassembling, transporting, repairing, and rebuilding, this mid-19th century structure is now ready for Museum visitation!  You can find the church on the hill above the 1820s American Farm.

* Want to see it all?  Consider getting an Annual Pass so you can come as often as you wish to see the things that interest you the most!  It pays for itself after just 2 visits.